Created By Experts

Pre-medical courses are prepared by specialist medical physicians and senior lecturers from major Australian University Medical Schools.

Proven Success

METC has helped hundreds of undergraduate and postgraduate students achieve their dream of being accepted into medical school.

Personal Touch

All pre-medical programs come with unlimited access to METC’s academic faculty for personal support and guidance in your med school journey.

Don’t leave your medical school dreams to chance

The academic faculty at METC has first hand experience in facilitating the admissions process for both undergraduate and postgraduate medicine at Australian Medical Schools. Therefore, METC is able to provide the most modern GAMSAT, UCAT and Medicine Interview Preparation available on the market today.

METC's individual courses and programs are delivered via our innovation online platform, allowing you to study anytime and anywhere.

Don’t leave your medical school dreams to chance; let METC help you into medical school.

GAMSAT

METC Institute's GAMSAT preparation programs enable the development of intuitive understanding of the concepts required to excel in all sections of GAMSAT and additionally, emphasise critical-thinking and a focus on application of knowledge. METC’s modern programs focus on teaching students the skills needed to perform exceptionally well on the GAMSAT and secure a place in postgraduate medicine.

GAMSAT Premier Program (GA500)

GAMSAT Premier Program (GA500)

$5,997.00

Calendar2 years

Clock2 years

PinGAMSAT classroom & online

  • 2200+ MCQs
  • 70 Hours on demand video content
  • Fortnightly group Q&A sessions
  • 50 marked essays with feedback report
  • 9 GAMSAT preparation subjects
  • 5 x full length exam
  • 1 day mock exam
  • Unlimited personal tutor support
  • 12 x personal tutorials
  • 12 x on demand mastermind sessions
  • Medicine Application Review
  • Medicine Interview Preparation

GAMSAT Foundations Program (GA400)

GAMSAT Foundations Program (GA400)

$2,397.00

Calendar1 years

Clock1 year

PinGAMSAT classroom & online

  • 1200+ MCQs
  • 30 Hours on demand video content
  • 6 group Q&A sessions
  • 12 marked essays with feedback report
  • 6 GAMSAT preparation subjects
  • 1 day mock exam

GAMSAT Essentials Program (GA300)

GAMSAT Essentials Program (GA300)

$1,097.00

Calendar6 Months

Clock6 Months

PinGAMSAT classroom & online

  • 500+ MCQs
  • 10 Hours on demand video content
  • 6 group Q&A sessions
  • 6 marked essays with feedback report
  • 4 GAMSAT preparation subjects
  • 1 day mock exam

UCAT

Prepare for UCAT with the expert tuition of the METC Institute. METC’s UCAT department is overseen by both experts in education and Australian doctors that are dedicated to helping students achieve their dream of entrance into Medicine. The programs below have helped high school students achieve top percentile scores in the UCAT.

UCAT Premier Program (UC300)

UCAT Premier Program (UC300)

$1,397.00

Calendar1 years

Clock1 year

PinMETC classroom & online

  • 5 Formal Personal Tutorials
  • Unlimited Informal Personal Tuition
  • Medicine Application Review
  • Medicine Interview Preparation
  • 5 specialised UCAT workshops

UCAT Foundations Program (UC200)

UCAT Foundations Program (UC200)

$397.00

Calendar6 Months

Clock6 Months

PinMETC classroom & online

  • Unlimited Informal Personal Tuition
  • 5 specialised UCAT workshops

Medicine Interviews

Students who complete METC's Medicine Interview Courses are better prepared and have the confidence to succeed in their Medical School Admissions Interview. The Medicine Interview programs below help students build an understanding of the intent behind the scenarios they will face in their interview, ideal response style and the scoring criteria standing in front of their spot in medicine school. The programs provide students with practical preparation and personal mentorship both in person and online.

Medicine Application & Interview Mentorship Program (IN600)

Medicine Application & Interview Mentorship Program (IN600)

$1,497.00

Calendar1 year

Clock1 year

PinMETC classroom & online

  • Comprehensive Medicine Interview Mentorship
  • Personal Tutorials
  • Application and Portfolio Review
  • 2 Subject Inclusions
  • Medicine Interview Online Scenario Course (IN301)
  • Medicine Interview Live Workshop (IN302)
  • 100 Interview Scenarios
  • 100 Exemplar Responses
  • Live Mock Interview Practice
  • Prepared by Specialist Doctors and Senior Lecturers at Australian Medical Schools

Medicine Interview Online Scenarios (IN301)

Medicine Interview Online Scenarios (IN301)

$997.00

Calendar1 year

Clock1 year

PinMETC classroom & online

  • 100 Interview Scenarios
  • 100 Exemplar Responses
  • Additional Online Modules
  • 100% Online
  • Specialist Doctors and Senior Lecturers at Australian Medical Schools

Medicine Interview Live Workshop (IN302)

Medicine Interview Live Workshop (IN302)

$997.00

Calendar1 year

Clock1 year

PinMETC classroom & online

  • Live Mock Interview
  • 4 Mock Medicine Interview
  • 20 MMI Stations
  • 1 Full Day Workshop
  • 1 Online Pre-Workshop Module

Talk to an expert

Complete the form below and we'll be in touch to answer your questions. We know how to get you into medicine - let us tell you how.

GAMSAT Study Techniques

GAMSAT Study Techniques

Unlike university examinations which are designed to assess acquisition of knowledge, Section 3 of GAMSAT is written to test for competencies in problem solving via the application of knowledge. This...

${reading_time(` Often members of the Academic Faculty are asked, how should I study for the GAMSAT? In order to answer this question, one has to first consider the nature and rationale of the exam. This article will focus on Section 3 of the GAMSAT as typically students reference this section when making such queries. Unlike university examinations which are designed to assess acquisition of knowledge, Section 3 of GAMSAT is written to test for competencies in problem solving via the application of knowledge. This often involves novel contexts that students have never seen. While the context is often new, the principles underpinning the assessment item should be familiar to students who have studied for the exam. The rationale for the style of assessment in GAMSAT is three-fold: Need to assess for prerequisite knowledge: Graduate medical programs are four years in length. Traditionally, the initial two years of a graduate medical program are spent covering theory while the final two years are spent gaining experience in various clinical rotations. From day one, medical programs require students to be ready to study clinical medicine and there is not time to learn basic scientific concepts. Knowledge therefore is a definite pre-requisite for the examination, however high performance requires a more in-depth and intuitive understanding of concepts not typically acquired through tertiary studies. The nature of medicine: Medicine is the process of problem-solving informed via specific knowledge acquired in training. While medical schools teach students about diseases, patients present with undifferentiated complaints. It is then up to the clinician to bridge the gap between their training, and the unique problem reported by the patient. This requires critical thinking. Section 3 of the GAMSAT is very similar in that it requires students to take their scientific knowledge and apply it to a unique problem. In order for the GAMSAT candidate to solve the problem, they must refer back to the core principles acquired during their study and experience reflecting on principles and apply knowledge swiftly and accurately. The role of the clinician is fundamentally the same, and Section 3 of the GAMSAT is written in order to select for students who demonstrate such skills. Efficacy as a selection tool: As the demand for medical school training positions outweighs supply by approximately 10-to-1, a process of selection is necessary. The tools used in this process of selection need to determine both acquisition of a prior body of knowledge and the ability to critically reason through problems. Furthermore, the selection tool needs to be of sufficient difficulty that many candidates cannot achieve maximal results as this would preclude discrimination of the relative quality of such candidates. The GAMSAT is the result of all of these selection requirements. What then is the implication of such considerations? It is vital to develop methods of study that develop deeper comprehension of the basic sciences. The only way to solve the problems presented in Section 3 of GAMSAT in a timely manner is to develop an intuition for the scientific concepts. This means developing an understanding of concepts along with their applications, contexts, and inter-relationships with other concepts already understood. It also means gaining experience considering and applying such concepts in differing contexts via completion of practice exercises. Concepts understood on a superficial level or not understood at all need to be re-evaluated and modelled to fit within the candidate’s cognitive set. Sometimes this will involve re-modelling of the existing cognitive set which may require significant work. How is an intuitive understanding of scientific concepts achieved? The simple answer is active methods of study. Active study is task-directed study that involves students seeking out information in order to close knowledge gaps, and answer questions regarding gaps or inconsistencies in knowledge. The aim is to create an innate understanding of the laws underpinning the sciences (the rules of the game). In next week’s GAMSAT webinar, active study techniques will be discussed in detail. For those reading this article at a later date, the webinar should be available with this article. `)} Arror right

Preparing for GAMSAT?

Preparing for GAMSAT?

Candidates that perform well in the GAMSAT make doing difficult things a habit. In GAMSAT, this means sitting practice exams under timed conditions, receiving honest feedback, and continually asking questions...

${reading_time(` If you find yourself here reading this post, you are likely preparing for GAMSAT. You may be preparing to the sit the GAMSAT for the first time, or you may be one of the majority of candidates who are re-sitting the exam. In either case, it is important to consider and eliminate the internal obstructions which may impede your success. To do so, ask yourself the following questions: What is it that you actually want? If you haven’t asked yourself this question, you need to do this before progressing. What does the question even mean? The process of thinking about your real desires is paramount – it necessitates a recognition of whims versus ambitions. Whims will fall in the face of adversity while true desires will weather the storm. Actually, wanting something means you are willing to forgo the alternatives. The so-called opportunity cost of committing to an endeavour such as GAMSAT and a career in medicine will evidently involve many sacrifices. Less evident is the imposed growth that such processes enforce which represents a further challenge to accept and overcome. Awareness of your ambitions and why they are important to you will soften the blow of the necessary sacrifices you will invariably be making both now while you study, and in your future work. As an aside, thinking about what you actually want is also important for you as an individual. The probability that you will get what you want (or more importantly, what is good for you) without active consideration is small. If you do not identify what you really want, and pursue it, others will find things for you to do and your life may not be all that it can be. In order to get what you actually want, what would your life look like? After considering what it is you actually want, you may have landed on a career in medicine which involves success in the GAMSAT etc. (if you didn’t, then pursue whatever else it is you actually want). Success requires a set of goals and an associated plan. Your plan at present will necessarily focus more on GAMSAT, and you will need to take responsibility in structuring your life so that you are maximising your potential. The actual task of planning your goals and GAMSAT studies will be discussed in the coming webinar associated with this post (it will be added to this article after the event). Taking responsibility for your studies again prevents others from allocating your time (which will not assist you in your goals). But also keep it mind that planning your days/weeks/months requires negotiating with yourself – you cannot be your own tyrant. Finally, what would your life be like if you habitually did the difficult things? In the author’s experience, the candidates that perform well in the GAMSAT (and in many other areas of life) make doing difficult things a habit. In GAMSAT, this means sitting practice exams under timed conditions, receiving honest feedback, and continually asking questions in order to improve. The result of these processes (whether failure or success) is always productive. Consider that your overall aim at this point may be to score 70+ in GAMSAT and enter into medicine. The fastest way to this destination is via a routine commitment to difficult things. It does not matter where you start, or the number of failures you encounter along the way – it is the process that is most important. The next blog post will focus on how to study for the GAMSAT. What does this mean? Rather than focusing simply on ‘what’ to study (the content), we will spend time considering the ‘how’. That is, detailing the things you should do in order to understand and retain your studies, and ultimately make the process of studying more fruitful, and – importantly – more enjoyable.`)} Arror right

Study for UCAT

UCAT Verbal Reasoning Tips

To implement this continuous improvement process, it is necessary to attempt many practice questions and adopt formal strategies from a professional preparation company. 

${reading_time(` In this article, we will discuss the approach and tips to verbal reasoning in the UCAT. In this test, the candidate has 21 minutes to answer 44 questions. Theoretical understanding of how to approach the section is necessary. Candidates must first of all understand the rationale for this section of the exam. Secondly, candidates must understand the various types of questions that can be asked, be able to identify these styles of question, and develop and implement a specific approach to each style of question. This passive learning can be achieved by reviewing the aforementioned styles of questioning and researching them online. Better still, a formal UCAT preparation course or program such as the IME's UCAT Verbal Reasoning Course will be able to assist with this. Armed with a basic understanding of the types of questions that may be asked, it is time for candidates to move away from passive learning and commit to active learning tasks. For Section I, these include the following: Completion of practice exams under examination conditions Review of practice exams Remediation of areas requiring improvement based on review of practice exams The above three steps are important to be completed in a cyclic manner. In this way, candidates take a reactive approach to improving their performance. For instance, after completion of the passive learning (theory) tasks pertaining to Verbal Reasoning section of the exam, a candidate may then complete a practice examination. After completion of this exam, at a minimum the candidate should review the exam and note the questions they were unable to answer including those they answered incorrectly and those they had to guess. Ideally, the candidate will review the entire exam and for each of the 44 questions categorise them according to question type. From here the candidate should keep a running tally of the types of questions they have attempted, and their percentage success rates for each. As time goes on, trends will develop which orient remedial activities. For instance, a candidate may observe their success rates to be lower for questions requiring a broader vocabulary, or specific types of writing such as in poetry or literature. The candidate can then specifically address this weakness by seeking out further resources to assist. As well as recording the types of questions attempted and success rates, for incorrect responses candidates should record the reason for their inability to answer. This can be for many reasons, however it is important that this is recorded. Even for simple things like misreading a question, it is important candidates record this mistake. By reviewing this information regularly, candidates are much less likely to make the same mistake again. To implement this continuous improvement process, it is necessary to attempt many practice questions and adopt formal strategies from a professional preparation company. `)} Arror right